Employment Litigation Laws

Learn here about important employment litigation laws. They cover a wide range of employee issues from employee and applicant discrimination, to retaliation, employee benefits, and workplace safety standards.

Employment litigation laws:

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

This law protects people from discrimination based on color, race, religion, national origin, or sex. It requires employers to reasonably accommodate employees and applicants religious practices unless doing that causes undue hardship on the business. It also protects people from being retaliated against for complaining of discrimination, filing a charge of discrimination, or participating in a discrimination case.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act

This law protects women from discrimination based on pregnancy, child birth, or pregnancy/childbirth conditions. It also protects them against retaliation for complaining of discrimination, filing a charge of discrimination, or participating in a discrimination case.

The Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA)

This law makes it illegal for a workplace to pay men and women different wages if they're performing equal work. It also protects them against retaliation for complaining of discrimination, filing a charge of discrimination, or participating in a discrimination case.

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA)

This law makes it illegal to discriminate against 40 year old (or older) employees or applicants on the basis of age. It also protects them against retaliation for complaining of discrimination, filing a charge of discrimination, or participating in a discrimination case.

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

This law sets Federal, State, and local government, and private sector, minimum standards for minimum wage, overtime pay, child labor standards.

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

This law requires that covered employers allow eligible employees to take unpaid, job protected and insurance coverage protected leave for specified family or medical reasons.

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA)

This federal law provides protections for employees by setting the minimum standards for pension and health plans in private industry.

Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)

This law makes it illegal to discriminate against qualified applicants or employees with disabilities. This is illegal in both the private sector as well as the state and local government. Employers must make reasonable accommodations for qualified employees with physical or mental limitations, unless doing that causes the business undue hardship. It also protects applicants and employees against retaliation for complaining of discrimination, filing a charge of discrimination, or participating in a discrimination case.

Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

This law adds to the previous law, making it illegal to discriminate against qualified employees or applicants with disabilities in the federal government.

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA)

This law makes it illegal to discriminate against an employee or applicant based on their genetic information. It also protects applicants and employees against retaliation for complaining of discrimination, filing a charge of discrimination, or participating in a discrimination case.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)

This federal law states that employees are entitled to a safe work environment free of known safety or health hazards. It also protects applicants and employees against retaliation for complaining of discrimination, filing a charge of discrimination, or participating in a discrimination case.

To learn more about the local employment litigation laws pertinent to your case, consult a litigation specialist.

 

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